Mensajes recientes

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
1
Hola,

El Parlamento Europeo ha hablado hoy 10 de febrero sobre Regulate social media platforms to defend democracy, MEPs say. On Wednesday, MEPs called for democratic oversight of tech giants to safeguard freedom of expression.
In a debate with Secretary of State for European Affairs Ana Paula Zacarias from the Portuguese Presidency of the Council, and Commission Vice-President Věra Jourová, almost all speakers criticised the vast power of social media platforms and their worrying impact on politics and freedom of speech.

Citing various decisions taken by the platforms to censor content or accounts, a large majority in the chamber highlighted the lack of clear rules governing such decisions and the lack of transparency of big tech practices. They urged the Commission to address the issue in the Digital Services Act and the Digital Markets Act, and as part of the Democracy Action Plan.

Most speakers focused on the need to provide legal certainty when removing content, and to ensure that such decisions lie with democratically accountable authorities, and not with private companies, in order to safeguard freedom of speech.


Other topics raised included:

the need to defend democracy and EU values by tackling disinformation and increasing efforts to subvert them or incite violence;
technology being used to enhance rather than limit political discourse, while addressing the issue of proliferation of hate speech and discrimination online;
algorithm transparency, use of personal data and the restriction (or ban) of microtargeting and profiling practices to fundamentally alter the business models of tech giants;
the problems caused by the emergence of tech monopolies and their impact on media pluralism, as well as on pluralism in public discourse;
the false dichotomy between the online and offline spheres and the need for rules that cover all aspects of life; and
the systemic risks, as well as the societal and economic harm, that major platforms can cause or exacerbate.

Catch up with the recorded debate here.


Background


In October 2020, in its recommendations on the Digital Services Act, Parliament stressed that the responsibility for enforcing the law must rest with public authorities, and that decisions should ultimately lie with an independent judiciary and not with a private commercial entity. [5]


The 2019 European Elections were protected from disinformation through an EU action plan and the European Commission’s code of practice for platforms. However, in the context of the Democracy Action Plan, the Commission has confirmed that self-regulatory measures need to be replaced with a mix of mandatory and co-regulation measures to appropriately protect the fundamental rights of users and regulate content moderation.


Parliament has recently also spoken out against the deterioration of fundamental rights, the worrying state of media freedom in the EU, and online disinformation campaigns by foreign and domestic actors.


Por lo tanto, esta acción de los eurodiputados es muy importante para hacer frente al tema principal de la Comision, así para otros que derivan del mismo.
2
Hola,

En esta noticia llamada Fighting COVID more effectively: How to make contact tracing better, according to NCSU researcher (https://www.wraltechwire.com/2021/02/10/fighting-covid-more-effectively-how-to-make-contact-tracing-better-according-to-ncsu-researcher/) se habla de un nuevo sistema de rastreo que puede ser más efectivo que el usado actualmente: Contact tracing is an important component of mitigating the spread of infections like COVID-19. Alun Lloyd, Drexel Professor of Mathematics at NC State, works with computational models to help us understand how diseases spread. Lloyd recently co-authored a study that found bidirectional contact tracing is twice as effective as forward tracing, the contact tracing method currently in use.
3
Zona de debate de la Comisión / Re: Privacidad durante la pandemia
« Último mensaje por 46034211-4-Lucía0 en Febrero 10, 2021, 06:38:37 pm »
Hola,

En esta noticia (https://gcn.com/articles/2021/02/08/contact-tracing-app-testing.aspx?m=1) de esta semana se habla de un sistema que puede ser importante para respetar la privacidad: Validating the security of contact tracing apps. To ensure that contact tracing apps protect users’ security, privacy and civil liberties, the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate has tapped a startup to develop app testing and validation services.

AppCensus, based in El Cerrito, Calif., already has a platform for at-scale analysis of mobile apps’ runtime behaviors and their security and privacy risks. The $198,600 Phase 1 award will allow the company to adapt its system to test Android and iOS contract tracing apps and publicly post the results, including descriptions and sensitivity of data the apps collect and the data-use policies of the apps’ publishers and third parties.




4
Hola,

En el nuevo mundo que se encuentra la gente tras la pandemia, los que gestionen deben tener en cuenta lo que dice esta noticia: https://securityboulevard.com/2021/02/new-security-risks-await-post-pandemic-travelers/



The COVID-19 pandemic has had a huge impact on travel, canceling business trips and vacations alike for almost a year. When it’s all over, we’ll return to physical meetings and finally book the trips we’ve been dying to take. Our pent-up need to get out and live again will likely drive a major recovery for the travel industry. That industry, however, has taken on a slightly different shape. COVID-19 has not only affected the physical aspects of travel but the digital, as well, introducing several new potential privacy risks to be aware of.

Contact Tracing

With the need to follow the spread of infection and monitor the pandemic, different methods of tracking people were introduced. Whether you have to register online to eat at a restaurant or write your name and address details on paper on entering a bar, you’re handing your personal data to unknown people. Even though the intended purpose is for medical professionals to have access to this data to fight the further spread of infection, we’ve seen unauthorized access to such data by venue staff as well as police. Unavoidable tracking of physical location poses a huge threat to privacy that has not been solved. In fact, criminals may also be able to access such data and use it to further attacks like phishing, spam or ransomware attacks.

Tracking Apps

What’s more, some countries require travelers to undergo medical tests or to share private information, sometimes by having them install tracking apps on their mobile devices, which can enable permanent, targeted surveillance. Such policies could remain long past the pandemic in some countries.

Tracking apps can allow various functionalities; they can acquire real-time location data, and also access the data on your smartphone. There may be other future uses for such tracking, such as within law enforcement. We’ll have to monitor how they are used later on.

Shoulder Surfing

In one interesting respect, the pandemic and subsequent restrictions may have actually removed a privacy risk. Last year, we conducted a study on “visual and audible hacking” (aka “shoulder surfing”), a common travel risk. With social distancing requirements and policies still active in many countries and aboard various modes of transportation, such snooping will be harder. Of course, if social distancing restrictions are relaxed, travelers will once again need to take precautions to avoid shoulder surfing.

Digitization of the travel industry didn’t just begin with the pandemic, nor is it relegated to the world of tracking COVID-19 infections. From buying tickets to the equipment in your hotel room, travel is becoming more and more digital—and introducing more and more risks. There are some other important considerations to keep in mind when leaving your home.

Smart Hotels

With the increase in smart technologies, you may already be overwhelmed by all the technology you have at home. It gets much worse in places you don’t own, since you have no control over the IoT-enabled devices around you, at all. Is there a smart TV with a camera in your room? What about smart air controls, voice assistants, entertainment offerings and all the other “little helpers” integrated in modern accommodations? All of them can be a threat to your privacy or cause a security problem if you connect your own devices to them. Even a power outlet with a USB port to charge your phone may be a risk, either in terms of security or the physical health of your device. Hotels and event locations are also using the current quiet period of reduced and/or restricted travel to renovate and upgrade their venues, which means we may see more such technologies when we return.

Public Wi-Fi

Free Wi-Fi is convenient, especially when you’re traveling. But did you ever wonder who controls the network you’re connected to? What type of data you share with the websites you’re opening? Connecting via unsecured Wi-Fi gives criminals an easy opportunity snoop on your traffic, collect sensitive data or even try to attack your devices. Using encryption, not only on your device, but also on your remote connections, should be as essential as your ticket while flying.

The Self-Service Concierge

Nowadays, hotels often offer publicly accessible self-service kiosks. These are usually tablets or a computer. The idea is simple: you log in to your email account (or wherever you may have stored your ticket), you open the digital ticket and print. But did you forget something? Logging out and clearing browsing data may easily be forgotten due to the stress of checking out. However, I’ve experienced many such devices that retain full access to all that data, like email, documents and calendars.

Travel Scams

Even before the pandemic, ensuring that you were communicating with the right person in the digital world was difficult, and in many cases, phishers and other scammers took advantage of this vulnerability. People became even more vulnerable in 2020. Criminals jumped on the opportunity to use the pandemic to make a profit using social engineering to trick people into revealing information. There have been cases of fake emails regarding canceled flight refunds, fake messages from government entities and those pretending to sell N95 masks.

The pandemic forced the introduction of new restrictions and digital processes to protect citizens’ health, and this, in turn, has altered the future of travel. The effects will last far beyond the end of the pandemic. Protecting yourself in the physical and digital worlds when you get back on the road will be more important than ever.


Por eso es necesario que la pedagogía se haya realizado satisfactoriamente cuando la movilidad internacional pueda realizarse.
5
Zona de debate de la Comisión / Re: Tormenta de Ideas
« Último mensaje por 46034211-4-Lucía0 en Febrero 10, 2021, 04:21:00 pm »
Hola,

Un tema que es interesante es si piratas informáticos podrían engañar al programa de algún modo, haciendo que hubiesen datos erróneos para hacer que la desconfianza a las apps de rastreo aumentase. ¿Podría ser que también se hackease el sistema de geolocalización y diesen información falsa, cómo se abordaría esta potencial cuestión?
6
Hola, soy Eva Baltar de la Salle Santiago.
Voy a explicar la geolocalización de los móviles por los operadores de telecomunicaciones, que podría ser una buena opción en caso de optar por la geolocalización.
Esta técnica consiste en que los operadores de telefonía móvil proporcionen información anonimizada de la ubicación de sus usuarios en las celdas de telefonía que definen sus antenas. Las operadoras recogen habitualmente datos de posición de sus abonados, que calculan en función de la fuerza con que les llegan las señales de cada móvil a las distintas antenas de una zona. Con esta información, que es necesaria para prestar el servicio, una operadora es capaz de estimar qué números de teléfono hay en cada celda en un determinado momento, e incluso dar una ubicación aproximada de cualquier teléfono móvil activo en una celda. Esta información, sin anonimizar, puede ser demandada por las Fuerzas y Cuerpos de Seguridad siempre mediando una orden judicial. Por otro lado, su utilización anonimizada fue utilizada por el Instituto Nacional de Estadística1 para estudios de movilidad. Durante la gestión de la crisis de la COVID-19, el Gobierno y la Comisión Europea han pedido que las operadoras proporcionen este tipo de información anonimizada para ver los movimientos de población.
Pero, ¿Representan estos datos una amenaza a la privacidad?
Con una gestión cuidadosa, el acceso apropiadamente anonimizado a dicha información no debería de representar una amenaza mayor que la que ya representaban antes. Es decir, siempre cabe la posibilidad de una anonimización incompleta, una subcontratación poco rigurosa o un ciberataque que pusiera en manos de un tercero la localización de los móviles de los usuarios, aunque este riesgo ya existía antes de la pandemia. Por hacer un uso mayor de estos datos anonimizados, puede haber un riesgo mayor, pero no exponencialmente mayor.
Por lo tanto, considero que en el caso de decantarse por la geolocalización, esta sería una buena opción, ya que es bastante segura.
Gracias.

Hola,

La cuestión aquí es asegurarse de que la gestión es cuidadosa, ¿quién asegura que es así, es fiable, no van a espiarnos, etc.? son preguntas que hemos hecho aquí y en las Sesiones, por lo que en la Nacional seguro que se puede debatir más al respecto, ya que es una cuestión que está en todas las dudas que presentan estas apps.

 
7
Buenos días, soy Eva Baltar de La Salle Santiago.
Día tras día, la crisis del COVID-19 ha supuesto una avalancha de información difícil de manejar para todas y todos. «El virus» se ha instalado en la primera fila de todos los medios de comunicación y, en muchos casos, en nuestra biografía.

En medio de la vorágine de información científica sobre el coronavirus, también han proliferado los mensajes alarmistas y poro rigurosos. De hecho, un estudio del MIT publicado en Science y basado en más de 126.000 hilos de noticias en Twitter, confirmaba recientemente que la verdad tarda unas seis veces más que la mentira en llegar a 1.500 personas en esta red social.
Por ello, es crucial buscar la fuente. Identificar a qué estudio o investigación se refiere al artículo para poder consultarlo. Hoy en día han proliferado los estudios científicos vinculados a la COVID19, y se publican alrededor de 2000 cada semana. Sin embargo, parte de esta investigación aún no ha sido revisada por pares ni publicada oficialmente en ninguna revista, por lo que es aconsejable ser particularmente crítico con artículos basados en estos estudios pendientes de publicación.
Por otro lado, es muy importante contrastar la información. Si una noticia muy llamativa o alarmista sólo aparece en un medio, debemos ser escépticos. Sería recomendable realizar  una búsqueda y confirmar si se puede encontrar en otras webs o medios. El centro de Estudios de Cultura Científica de la UPF comparte en su web una selección de recursos informativos útiles y rigurosos tanto para los profesionales de la comunicación como para la ciudadanía sobre la crisis de la Covid.

Por último, las redes sociales también se están poniendo las pilas. WhatsApp ha tomado medidas para evitar los reenvíos masivos de mensajes, y Twitter y Facebook intentan dirigir a los usuarios a fuentes fiables como la OMS para evitar la propagación de información sensacionalista. Y no es para menos; la ciudadanía pide medidas claras contra la «infodemia» global causada por la desinformación viral a través de las redes sociales – una desinformación que, según critica el personal sanitario, pone en peligro las vidas que ellos intentan salvar.
Con algoritmos de inteligencia artificial capaces de detectar ciertos patrones que se corresponden con las noticias falsas, la tecnología podría en efecto jugar un papel importante en el futuro de las «fake news». Pero la última decisión la tenemos cada una y cada uno de nosotros.

Muchas gracias.

Hola,

El caso es que hasta tribunales han ecahado la culpa a celebridades sobre la creación del coronavirus sin priebas: https://www.lavanguardia.com/vida/20210113/6181875/coronavirus-tribunal-peruano-acusa-bill-gates-crear-covid.html Los magistrados aseguran que el coronavirus es obra de las "élites criminales que dominan el mundo"

Afortunadamente, Facebook apoyará las campañas de vacunación del COVID-19 y eliminará la información falsa (https://www.muycomputer.com/2021/02/09/facebook-campana-vacuna-covid-19/), ya que noticias como Fake news y conspiraciones: cómo el 5G debe ahora recuperar su reputación online para acabar con el lastre en su imagen de la desinformaciónUna campaña de Orange en Francia ya se centra en crear una suerte de vínculo e (https://www.puromarketing.com/141/34802/fake-news-conspiraciones-como-debe-ahora-recuperar-reputacion-online-acabar.html) hace que se lleguen a situaciones como la siguiente:

China pide que la BBC se disculpe por 'noticias falsas' sobre Covid-19; televisora se defiende
https://aristeguinoticias.com/0402/mundo/china-pide-que-la-bbc-se-disculpe-por-noticias-falsas-sobre-covid-19-la-cadena-britanica-se-defiende/

Está claro que hay que erradicar las noticias falsas y teorías de a conspiración.

8
Hola, soy Eva Baltar de la Salle Santiago.
Voy a explicar la geolocalización de los móviles por los operadores de telecomunicaciones, que podría ser una buena opción en caso de optar por la geolocalización.
Esta técnica consiste en que los operadores de telefonía móvil proporcionen información anonimizada de la ubicación de sus usuarios en las celdas de telefonía que definen sus antenas. Las operadoras recogen habitualmente datos de posición de sus abonados, que calculan en función de la fuerza con que les llegan las señales de cada móvil a las distintas antenas de una zona. Con esta información, que es necesaria para prestar el servicio, una operadora es capaz de estimar qué números de teléfono hay en cada celda en un determinado momento, e incluso dar una ubicación aproximada de cualquier teléfono móvil activo en una celda. Esta información, sin anonimizar, puede ser demandada por las Fuerzas y Cuerpos de Seguridad siempre mediando una orden judicial. Por otro lado, su utilización anonimizada fue utilizada por el Instituto Nacional de Estadística1 para estudios de movilidad. Durante la gestión de la crisis de la COVID-19, el Gobierno y la Comisión Europea han pedido que las operadoras proporcionen este tipo de información anonimizada para ver los movimientos de población.
Pero, ¿Representan estos datos una amenaza a la privacidad?
Con una gestión cuidadosa, el acceso apropiadamente anonimizado a dicha información no debería de representar una amenaza mayor que la que ya representaban antes. Es decir, siempre cabe la posibilidad de una anonimización incompleta, una subcontratación poco rigurosa o un ciberataque que pusiera en manos de un tercero la localización de los móviles de los usuarios, aunque este riesgo ya existía antes de la pandemia. Por hacer un uso mayor de estos datos anonimizados, puede haber un riesgo mayor, pero no exponencialmente mayor.
Por lo tanto, considero que en el caso de decantarse por la geolocalización, esta sería una buena opción, ya que es bastante segura.
Gracias.
9
Buenos días, soy Eva Baltar de La Salle Santiago.
Día tras día, la crisis del COVID-19 ha supuesto una avalancha de información difícil de manejar para todas y todos. «El virus» se ha instalado en la primera fila de todos los medios de comunicación y, en muchos casos, en nuestra biografía.

En medio de la vorágine de información científica sobre el coronavirus, también han proliferado los mensajes alarmistas y poro rigurosos. De hecho, un estudio del MIT publicado en Science y basado en más de 126.000 hilos de noticias en Twitter, confirmaba recientemente que la verdad tarda unas seis veces más que la mentira en llegar a 1.500 personas en esta red social.
Por ello, es crucial buscar la fuente. Identificar a qué estudio o investigación se refiere al artículo para poder consultarlo. Hoy en día han proliferado los estudios científicos vinculados a la COVID19, y se publican alrededor de 2000 cada semana. Sin embargo, parte de esta investigación aún no ha sido revisada por pares ni publicada oficialmente en ninguna revista, por lo que es aconsejable ser particularmente crítico con artículos basados en estos estudios pendientes de publicación.
Por otro lado, es muy importante contrastar la información. Si una noticia muy llamativa o alarmista sólo aparece en un medio, debemos ser escépticos. Sería recomendable realizar  una búsqueda y confirmar si se puede encontrar en otras webs o medios. El centro de Estudios de Cultura Científica de la UPF comparte en su web una selección de recursos informativos útiles y rigurosos tanto para los profesionales de la comunicación como para la ciudadanía sobre la crisis de la Covid.

Por último, las redes sociales también se están poniendo las pilas. WhatsApp ha tomado medidas para evitar los reenvíos masivos de mensajes, y Twitter y Facebook intentan dirigir a los usuarios a fuentes fiables como la OMS para evitar la propagación de información sensacionalista. Y no es para menos; la ciudadanía pide medidas claras contra la «infodemia» global causada por la desinformación viral a través de las redes sociales – una desinformación que, según critica el personal sanitario, pone en peligro las vidas que ellos intentan salvar.
Con algoritmos de inteligencia artificial capaces de detectar ciertos patrones que se corresponden con las noticias falsas, la tecnología podría en efecto jugar un papel importante en el futuro de las «fake news». Pero la última decisión la tenemos cada una y cada uno de nosotros.

Muchas gracias.
10
Buenas tardes

En lo referente a lo que mencionó Carla en su primera intervención me gustaría preguntarle cómo pretende que la información transmitida sea anónima y cómo pretende hacerle creer a la gente que la cesión de datos al Estado no es una excusa para "mantenerlos controlados".

 Asimismo, me gustaría incidir en que esto supondría una violación de la Ley de Protección de Datos de Carácter Personal, incluida en el BOE, y que constituye un delito.

Hola,

Esos argumentos son aceptables, pero decir que nos van a controlar es algo que da alas a los conspiracionistas y sus teorías con fake news. Puede ser cierto, pero se debe contrastar todo con fuentes fiables creadas por expertos en la materia. Proponer la creación de una ley de protección de datos para afianzar la seguridad de la población es vital para que haya confianza en las apps de trazabilidad.
Hola, soy Eva Baltar de La Salle.
Estoy completamente de acuerdo con la delegada Lucía, a pesar de que evidentemente es una opción que nos controlen no se debería dar por hecho, ya que se supone que el Estado está compuesto por personas competentes y responsables. Puede que no sea así, pero se debería apoyar y confiar en ellos, esta confianza ayudaría al uso más frecuente de la aplicación y, además , a evitar los bulos y las conspiraciones como bien mencionó. La ley de a protección de datos es algo que haría que mucha gente se descargara la aplicación ya que ayudaría a perder el miedo a la falta de privacidad.
Gracias.

Hola,

Seguramente los que desconfían de gobiernos y aplicaciones, sean los que no dudan en compartir cada uno de sus movimientos en redes sociales. No es coherente al haber casos en los que les robaban en casa al publicar que no estaban en casa, etc. La app es útil si la usas correctamente.
Hola, soy Eva Baltar de La Salle Santiago.
Estoy de acuerdo contigo, es algo irónico que las redes sociales sean consideradas más seguras y sean más usadas. De hecho, en Europa, el norte tiene el mayor porcentaje de usuarios de redes sociales (79 %) del continente. Por tanto, se plantea la siguiente cuestión: ¿Por qué utilizan los europeos las redes sociales sin ningún tipo de problema y se niegan a su vez a instalarse las aplicaciones de rastreo para covid? La respuesta es simple: las redes sociales son algo que ha estado presente en nuestras vidas años, estamos acostumbrados a ellas. Nos da igual la falta de privacidad porque disfrutamos usándolas. En cambio, las aplicaciones como Radar Covid son extremadamente recientes, y la gente no quiere descargarlas porque no les ve el atractivo o necesidad, lo cual es muy negativo ya que estas apps podrían ser cruciales para frenar la pandemia. Por tanto, como ya se ha mencionado, las campañas publicitarias son cruciales para aumentar el uso de estas.
Gracias.
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10